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“Isaac spoke up and said to his father Abraham, “Father?”

“Yes, my son?” Abraham replied.

“The fire and wood are here,” Isaac said,

“but where is the lamb or the burnt offering?

Abraham answered,

“God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”

And the two of them went on together.”

Genesis 22:7-8

2I was reminded of the story of Abraham the other evening, as I was catching the first part of the Bible mini series (a five-part mini series, shown on Sunday evenings on the History Channel … but I watched it on YouTube).

This story of Abraham and Isaac is one of my favorite stories in the entire Bible. It provides sufficient drama, intrigue, secrets and integrity to hold ones attention fully, and leaves you in awe, but still wondering when it is through.

Isaac intrigues me in this story. Although the Bible only records one interaction between he and his father, it is reasonable that there were many more …

perhaps discussing the humorous individuals in their camp of people

perhaps discussing the ewe about to birth

perhaps discussing the servant who always forgets to bring the morning meal on time

For Isaac, we presume that this trip was not out of routine, but a normal, common and regular movement of life.

Three days to journey.

Three days for this son, this son whose age we do not know (estimated to be anywhere between 5-30), to walk and talk with his aging father (well over seventy-five) who seems to be hanging onto every word Isaac speaks, and yet a million miles away at the same time.

On the third day of the journey, “he (Abraham) said to his servants, “Stay here with the donkey while I and the boy go over there. We will worship and then we will come back to you.”

WE … no reason for Isaac to doubt, to wonder, to worry.

But then, as Abraham is laying the wood for the burnt offering (tied together with the ropes that would hold the offering to the alter, no doubt) onto the back of his son, Isaac asks his father, “dad, we have the wood, we have the fire, but there is no lamb to suffer for our sins.”

Isaac knew that blood, innocent blood, must be spilled and poured out, for their offering to be worthy of the One who would forgive them. This was the only way that their sin-filled lives could be made clean.

Abraham responded with assurance and confidence again, “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”

And doesn’t He always?

God, through the grace that only He can and does offer, provides.

He provides the redemption

He provides the forgiveness

He provides the lamb … his son.

Tomorrow, I will finish this mini-series on the testing of Abraham, with more about the lamb.

*This is a re-post, of a re-post, from a few years ago. The story of Sarah, Abraham and Isaac have always captivated me.

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“Isaac spoke up and said to his father Abraham, “Father?”
“Yes, my son?” Abraham replied.
“The fire and wood are here,” Isaac said,
“but where is the lamb or the burnt offering?
Abraham answered,
“God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”
And the two of them went on together.”
Genesis 22:7-8

2I was reminded of the story of Abraham the other evening, as I was catching the first part of the Bible mini series (a five-part mini series, shown on Sunday evenings on the History Channel … but I watched it on YouTube).

This story of Abraham and Isaac is one of my favorite stories in the entire Bible. It provides sufficient drama, intrigue, secrets and integrity to hold ones attention fully, and leaves you in awe, but still wondering when it is through.

Isaac intrigues me in this story. Although the Bible only records one interaction between he and his father, it is reasonable that there were many more …

perhaps discussing the humorous individuals in their camp of people
perhaps discussing the ewe about to birth
perhaps discussing the servant who always forgets to bring the morning meal on time

For Isaac, we presume that this trip was not out of routine, but a normal, common and regular movement of life.

Three days to journey.

Three days for this son, this son whose age we do not know (estimated to be anywhere between 5-30), to walk and talk with his aging father (well over seventy-five) who seems to be hanging onto every word Isaac speaks, and yet a million miles away at the same time.

On the third day of the journey, “he (Abraham) said to his servants, “Stay here with the donkey while I and the boy go over there. We will worship and then we will come back to you.”

WE … no reason for Isaac to doubt, to wonder, to worry.

But then, as Abraham is laying the wood for the burnt offering (tied together with the ropes that would hold the offering to the alter, no doubt) onto the back of his son, Isaac asks his father, “dad, we have the wood, we have the fire, but there is no lamb to suffer for our sins.”

Isaac knew that blood, innocent blood, must be spilled and poured out, for their offering to be worthy of the One who would forgive them. This was the only way that their sin-filled lives could be made clean.

Abraham responded with assurance and confidence again, “God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering, my son.”

And doesn’t He always?

God, through the grace that only He can and does offer, provides.

He provides the redemption

He provides the forgiveness

He provides the lamb … his son.

Tomorrow, I will finish this mini-series on the testing of Abraham, with more about the lamb.

*This is a re-post, of a re-post, from a few years ago. The story of Sarah, Abraham and Isaac have always captivated me.

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“Then God said,

Take your son,

your only son, whom you love

—Isaac—

and go to the region of Moriah.

Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.””

Genesis 22:2

Those emboldened words make my heart skip a beat. That a loving God, Creator God, would ask such a thing of a father who has been told for so many years that his descendants would be as numerous as the stars in the sky?

abraham-and-isaac-on-mount-moriah-275x206

I was reminded of the story of Abraham the other evening, as I was catching the first part of the Bible mini series (a five-part mini series, shown on Sunday evenings on the History Channel … but I watched it on YouTube).

Although the Bible does not give an emotion-filled account of Abraham’s choice to listen to, and obey the message from God, I can only imagine the agonizing that he felt, that he experienced when God commanded him to sacrifice his son, through whom Abraham had believed God would fulfill his promise to make him the Father of many nations.

Abraham was an old man when this story enfolded. He probably appreciated the blessing of awakening each morning, still able to watch his son grow and still able to teach him how to be all that it is to be ‘man’. The son through whom Abraham’s name would continue to live, long after his earthly end.

To have put this hope for the future of his name upon his son might have caused Abraham to forget where his hope really was … in El Shaddai  … ‘God Almighty’ or ‘God the All-Sufficient One’. Maybe, as he was looking to the end of his life, Abraham was looking more to Isaac as the All-Sufficient One?

Whatever the reason for this ‘test’, God knew what Abraham would choose to do when He said,

Take your son,

your only son, whom you love

—Isaac—

and go to the region of Moriah.

Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.”

God was not looking for Abraham to shed the blood of his son … blood that was his (and Sarah’s) . God was looking for Abraham to prove his commitment … to put his money where his mouth was.

What a test!

Reading this account of Noah and Isaac reminded me of 1 Corinthians 10:13:

“No temptation has seized you except what is common to man.

And God is faithful;

he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear.

But when you are tempted,

he will also provide a way out so that you can stand up under it.”

Although God’s instruction to Abraham was not a temptation, the principle is still the same;

God will allow us to have struggles, temptations, testings … but never more than He knows we can handle (sometimes I wish He did not have so much faith in what I can handle) … and He IS faithful … He will provide a way out!

*This is a re-post, of a re-post, from a few years ago. The story of Sarah, Abraham and Isaac have always captivated me.

Read Full Post »

“Then God said,
Take your son,
your only son, whom you love
—Isaac—
and go to the region of Moriah.
Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.””
Genesis 22:2

Those emboldened words make my heart skip a beat. That a loving God, Creator God, would ask such a thing of a father who has been told for so many years that his descendants would be as numerous as the stars in the sky?

abraham-and-isaac-on-mount-moriah-275x206

I was reminded of the story of Abraham the other evening, as I was catching the first part of the Bible mini series (a five-part mini series, shown on Sunday evenings on the History Channel … but I watched it on YouTube).

Although the Bible does not give an emotion-filled account of Abraham’s choice to listen to, and obey the message from God, I can only imagine the agonizing that he felt, that he experienced when God commanded him to sacrifice his son, through whom Abraham had believed God would fulfill his promise to make him the Father of many nations.

Abraham was an old man when this story enfolded. He probably appreciated the blessing of awakening each morning, still able to watch his son grow and still able to teach him how to be all that it is to be ‘man’. The son through whom Abraham’s name would continue to live, long after his earthly end.

To have put this hope for the future of his name upon his son might have caused Abraham to forget where his hope really was … in El Shaddai  … ‘God Almighty’ or ‘God the All-Sufficient One’. Maybe, as he was looking to the end of his life, Abraham was looking more to Isaac as the All-Sufficient One?

Whatever the reason for this ‘test’, God knew what Abraham would choose to do when He said,

Take your son,
your only son, whom you love
—Isaac—
and go to the region of Moriah.
Sacrifice him there as a burnt offering on a mountain I will show you.”

God was not looking for Abraham to shed the blood of his son … blood that was his (and Sarah’s) . God was looking for Abraham to prove his commitment … to put his money where his mouth was.

What a test!

Reading this account of Noah and Isaac reminded me of 1 Corinthians 10:13:

“No temptation has seized you except what is common to man.
And God is faithful;
he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear.
But when you are tempted,
he will also provide a way out so that you can stand up under it.”

Although God’s instruction to Abraham was not a temptation, the principle is still the same;

God will allow us to have struggles, temptations, testings … but never more than He knows we can handle (sometimes I wish He did not have so much faith in what I can handle) … and He IS faithful … He will provide a way out!

*This is a re-post, of a re-post, from a few years ago. The story of Sarah, Abraham and Isaac have always captivated me.

Read Full Post »

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